Policy Factsheet

Social Host Liability and Keg Registration

Reasons for Policy

  • In 2009, 67% of high school students who drank reported binge drinking in the last 30 days.2
  • Heavy alcohol consumption in adolescence is linked to heavier consumption, alcohol dependence, and alcohol-related problems in early adulthood. 3
  • The cost of alcohol use by underage drinkers was estimated to be $52 billion annually in 1999.4

Community Groups

  • Local Alcohol Retailers
  • Local Government
  • Local Law Enforcement

Policy Components

  • Require beer keg purchasers to complete forms that link their names to the keg numbers (keg registration)
  • Enforcement of social host liability laws in which adults that give alcohol to minors or intoxicated adults can be sued for damages or injuries caused by the minor or intoxicated adult
  • Campaigns to ensure social hosts' awareness of social host liability laws

Desired Outcomes

  • Reduced alcohol use among underage youth
  • Reduce blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) among adults
  • Reduce alcohol-related traffic crashes and fatalities
  • Reduce alcohol-related unintentional injuries

For all policies we describe on this website, we have applied the Standards of Evidence as defined by Flay et al. (2005) in the Standards of Evidence document published by Prevention Science. 1

The levels of effectiveness as noted are: 1 = meets criteria for policy effectiveness (consistent, positive outcomes from at least two high-quality experimental or quasi-experimental trials using a comparison group or interrupted time series design); 2 = consistent evidence available linking policy with positive outcomes from high-quality observational studies only; 3 = insufficient evidence available for policy or policy components.

Level of Evidence Available to Evaluate Effectiveness of Policy

For all policies we describe on this website, we have applied the Standards of Evidence as defined by Flay et al. (2005) in the Standards of Evidence document published by Prevention Science.

The effectiveness level of this policy is 3: Insufficient Evidence Available.

The levels of effectiveness as noted are:

  1. meets criteria for policy effectiveness (consistent, positive outcomes from at least two high-quality experimental or quasi-experimental trials using a comparison group or interrupted time series design);
  2. consistent evidence available linking policy with positive outcomes from high-quality observational studies only;
  3. insufficient evidence available for policy or policy components.

Achievable Results

The following summary of achievable results is based on a published review of the scientific evidence.

  • The evidence of effects of keg registration and social host liability laws is mixed. However, favorable trends in impact on traffic crash fatalities, heavy alcohol consumption, and drunk driving have been observed. More research is needed.4

References


  1. Flay, BR, Biglan, A, Boruch, RF, Ganzalez Castro, F, Gottfredson, D, Kellam, S, Moscicki, EK, Schinke, S, Valentine, JC, & Ji, P (2005). Standards of evidence: Criteria for efficacy, effectiveness and dissemination. Prevention Science, 6(3), 151-175.
     

  2. Campbell CA et al. (2009). The effectiveness of limiting alcohol outlet density as a means of reducing excessive alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 37(6). 556-569.  

  3. Anderson P, de Bruijn A, Angus K, Gordon R, & Hastings G (2009). Impact of alcohol advertising and media exposure on adolescent alcohol use: A systematic review of longitudinal studies. Alcohol & Alcoholism, 44(3), 229-243.  

  4. Grube J (2005). Preventing alcohol-related problems: Public policy strategies. Transportation Research E-Circular, E-C072, 93-118.  

  5. Biglan, A., Boruch, R.F., Castro, F.G., Flay, B.R., Gottfredson, D., Ji, P., . . . Valentine, J.C. (2005). Standards of evidence: Criteria for efficacy, effectiveness and dissemination. Prevention Science, 6(3): 151-175  

  6. Campbell, C.A. (2009). The effectiveness of limiting alcohol outlet density as a means of reducing excessive alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 37(6), 556-569.  

  7. Grube, J. (2005). Preventing alcohol-related problems: Public policy strategies. Transportation Research E-Circular, E-C072, 93-118