Anthony Biglan

Anthony Biglan is a Senior Scientist at Oregon Research Institute, Director of the Center on Early Adolescence, and the Co-Director of the Promise Neighborhood Research Consortium. He has been conducting research on the development and prevention of child and adolescent problem behavior for the past 30 years. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; high-risk sexual behavior; and antisocial behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco use both through school-based programs and community-wide interventions. He has also performed evaluations of interventions to prevent high-risk sexual behavior, antisocial behavior, and reading failure. He and colleagues at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences published a book summarizing the epidemiology, cost, etiology, prevention, and treatment of youth with multiple problems. He also co-authored Community-monitoring systems: Tracking and improving the well-being of America’s children and adolescents. Dr. Biglan served as an expert witness in the U.S. Department of Justice lawsuit against the tobacco companies. He is a former president of the Society for Prevention Research and board member since 1998. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention, which recently released its report documenting numerous evidence-based preventive interventions.

Workgroups

Brian Flay

Brian R. Flay, DPhil, is Co-Director of the PNRC. He is Professor of Public Health at Oregon State University (OSU) and Director of the Youth Core of the Hallie Ford Center for Healthy Children and Families at OSU. Over the past 30 years, he has co-developed multiple prevention programs and conducted numerous school-based randomized trials of their efficacy. He was PI of the Aban Aya Youth Project, which developed and evaluated a school curriculum and community program for inner-city African-American youth. This was one of the first studies to demonstrate that the same program could prevent multiple problem behaviors (substance use, violence, and unsafe sex). Dr. Flay now works on positive youth development. His recent evaluations of the Positive Action programs in Hawaii and Chicago have shown that positive youth development can prevent multiple problem behaviors, improve disciplinary referrals, positive behaviors, school attendance, and academic achievement. Dr. Flay chaired a Society for Prevention Research committee to develop standards to establish the efficacy, effectiveness, and dissemination readiness of prevention programs.

Workgroups

Mike Biglan

Mike is the Chief Technology Officer (CTO) at Concentric Sky, a software and web development firm based in Eugene, Oregon. He is chair of the Technology Workgroup and on the Steering Committee of the PNRC. For the past three years, Mike has led a variety of new development projects from iPhone Apps to Web 2.0 web applications in Django/Python and Java. Over the last decade, he has worked as a senior programmer and architect, biostatistician, project manager, and consultant on a variety of research and technology projects. Mike has an M.S. in Computer Science & Engineering from UC San Diego and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Chicago. The Technology Workgroup developed the website that will interconnect neighborhoods and help connect them with the best science on programs, policies, and kernels. Giving neighborhoods tools to assist with outcome goals and measurement of those goals, the website will also provide strategies to help them fund and implement those interventions.

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Dennis Embry

Dennis D. Embry, PhD, is President/CEO of PAXIS Institute in Tucson. He is chair of the Evidence-Based Kernels Team of the PNRC. Over the past 30 years, he has developed, tested, and disseminated large-scale strategies to reduce or prevent unintentional or violent injuries, substance abuse, and mental disorders. The hallmark of his work focuses on low-cost prevention, intervention, and treatment strategies. Dr. Embry has prevention efforts in 15 states, and is a former National Research Council Senior Fellow in the British Commonwealth.

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Diana Fishbein

Diana H. Fishbein is a Senior Fellow directing the Transdisciplinary Science and Translational Prevention Program for RTI International. Over the past 25 years, Dr. Fishbein has been studying influences on brain development and functioning, and ways in which neurological deficits and developmental delays alter behavioral trajectories and ability to respond to interventions. She applies a model that accounts for a new generation of findings in neuroscience in the context of environmental (e.g., lead exposure, poverty) and psychosocial (e.g., child maltreatment, witnessing violence) risk factors. This research suggests that an interaction between brain and environmental factors contributes to behavioral problems in children, adolescents, and young adults. Furthermore, Dr. Fishbein’s projects have found that reduced capacity in neurobiological functions due to the influence of a variety of external conditions present obstacles to preventive and treatment intervention effects. As a result of this research, new strategies for preventive and treatment interventions that directly target these underlying neural mechanisms in behavioral disorders can be designed to minimize risk-taking behaviors and improve healthy decision making. Since neuroscience shows that brain plasticity continues into adulthood, targeted behavioral and social interventions can help “rewire” neural circuits to compensate for poor environmental conditions to promote more advantageous outcomes.

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Jean Kjellstrand

Jean M. Kjellstrand, MSW, PhD, is an Associate Scientist at ORI and Oregon Social Learning Center. Her primary research interests include positive youth development and prevention of youth antisocial behavior, development of interventions for children and families of incarcerated parents, development of care systems for children and families in high-risk circumstances, and cross-national research on effective community and system-level interventions. Before turning to prevention science, Dr. Kjellstrand was a licensed social worker for 20 years, during which time she developed and coordinated diverse individual, group, and community interventions for children and families in high-risk situations. She developed and coordinated a collaborative, system-wide county program geared to strengthen and support families, trained community leaders in the US on curricula addressing the prevention of substance abuse among youth, developed and ran a “life skills” program for foster teens approaching the age of emancipation from the system, and developed and managed programs for newly resettled refugee youth.

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Kelli Komro

Kelli Komro, MPH, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Health Outcomes & Policy in the College of Medicine and Associate Director of the Institute for Child Health Policy at the University of Florida. She has been PI or Co-I on several large, NIH-funded, group-randomized controlled trials focusing on preventing alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use; violence; and HIV among youth, both in the US and internationally, including Chicago, rural Minnesota, Russia, India, and Tanzania. One aspect of Dr. Komro’s research involves development of prevention curricula evaluated and refined via group-randomized trial designs. She is second author on four published prevention curricula now disseminated to schools nationally, which are in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices and designated exemplary programs by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, US Department of Justice and by the Safe and Drug-Free Schools, US Department of Education.

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Scott McConnell

Scott is a Professor of Educational Psychology and Fesler-Lampert Chair of Urban and Regional Affairs at the University of Minnesota. He has worked in the area of early childcare and education for 25 years, including research in homes, classrooms, and communities. His current projects include Five Hundred under 5, a multidisciplinary community-based research and service development program to improve school readiness for high-risk youngsters in a high-poverty area of Minneapolis. He is leading the Minnesota site for the Center for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood, a research and development center funded by the IES. He is particularly interested in the design, evaluation, and implementation of general outcome measures of young children’s development for use in RtI and other intervention models.

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Ron Prinz

Ron Prinz, Ph.D., is Carolina Distinguished Professor and Director of the Parenting and Family Research Center at the University of South Carolina. His research focuses on the prevention of children’s social, emotional, behavioral and health problems, and the strengthening of parenting and family functioning via community-wide intervention strategies. Prinz has served as principal investigator on numerous research grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is currently on the board of directors for the Society for Prevention Research. He also co-directs the Behavioral-Biomedical Interface Program (an interdisciplinary research training program in prevention science) and the Research Consortium on Children and Families at the University of South Carolina.

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Patrick Aaby

Patrick G. Aaby has over 25 years in public education as a teacher and administrator. He has been an adviser on prevention issues to the Governor and Chief Adviser to the Lt. Governor of Washington State. The Washington State PTA elected him to their Board of Directors and he served as their State Legislative Director. Dr. Aaby has also chaired the Washington State Community Mobilization Board, where he worked with local schools and coalitions statewide to assess student, family, school, and community needs. Further, he served as a negotiator and facilitator to integrate and align school and community resources to more effectively reduce risk factors and enhance protective factors associated with substance abuse, youth violence, juvenile delinquency, teen pregnancy, and dropping out of school. Related to this, Pat has extensive experience providing technical assistance to school districts and community coalitions in using survey and incident data to conduct school and community level needs assessments, implement programs and improve student and community-based outcomes. Dr. Aaby is on the PNRC Advisory Board and serves as consultant to the PNRC Technology Workgroup.

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Carl Bell

Carl C. Bell, MD, is President and CEO of Chicago’s Community Mental Health Council (CMHC) and Foundation, Inc., a large, multimillion-dollar comprehensive community mental health center employing 390 social service professionals. Dr. Bell is also Clinical Professor of Psychiatry & Public Health and Director of the Institute for Juvenile Research (IJR) at the University of Illinois at Chicago. IJR is a 100-year-old multimillion-dollar academic institute providing child and family research, training, and service, employing 257 academic faculty and support staff. In 40 years, he has published more than 400 articles, chapters, and books on mental health, including The Sanity of Survival.

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Laurie Brotman

Laurie Miller Brotman, PhD, is the Corzine Family Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Director of the Institute for Prevention Science, and Director of the Harris Obesity Prevention Effort at the NYU Child Study Center. Dr. Brotman is a clinical developmental psychologist and prevention scientist whose research focuses on the prevention of negative outcomes in high-risk pediatric populations. She has dedicated her career to the development and study of programs aimed at promoting mental health, physical health, and academic success for ethnic minority children from underserved communities. She is the principal investigator on grants from the NIMH, the Institute for Education Sciences of the DOE and the CDC. She is a member of the Steering Committee of the NYU Center of Excellence in Addiction, and leads a translational research group on preventive interventions for obesity and conduct disorders in pediatric populations. Dr. Brotman is serving her second term on the Board of Directors of the Society for Prevention Research; she received the Society’s prestigious 2009 Community, Culture, and Prevention Science Award. In 2009, the NYU Langone Medical Center selected her to be an honored member of the YWCA Academy of Women Leaders.

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J. Mark Eddy

J. Mark Eddy, PhD, is a Senior Scientist at Oregon Social Learning Center and principal investigator on several randomized prevention trials of programs delivered within systems of care relevant to children and families (e.g., the Child Study, the Parent Child Study, the Paths Project, and the Linking the Interests of Families and Teachers Project (LIFT), a study of transition into young adulthood, which significantly reduced substance use and antisocial behavior among at-risk elementary school children up to seven years later). He is a co-investigator on the Latino Youth and Family Empowerment Project, developing and studying a culturally specific parent training intervention for Latino families with youngsters at risk for substance use and related problems and the Adolescent Latino Acculturation Study, designed to learn more about how Latino families and their middle school youth who have immigrated to the U.S. adapt to life in the U.S. Dr. Eddy was the key developer of the Early Career Prevention Network.

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Vincent Francisco

Vincent T. Francisco, PhD, is Associate Professor in the Department of Public Health Education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He is a member of the Kernels Team, which is developing simple behavior influence techniques to disseminate widely to neighborhood members. Dr. Francisco’s current research involves community systems change, building the capacity of community members and population-level behavior change in community settings. His research has focused on adolescent development, reduction of risk for HIV/AIDS, teen substance abuse, youth violence, teen parenthood, and chronic/cardiovascular diseases. He also has considerable experience in providing technical support for the development of coalitions. He is a co-inventor (with Fawcett and Schultz) of the Community Tool Box [http://ctb.ku.edu/]..

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Mark Greenberg

Mark Greenberg, PhD, holds the Bennett Endowed Chair in Prevention Research in Penn State's College of Health and Human Development. He is the Director of the Prevention Research Center for the Promotion of Human Development. Since 1981, Dr. Greenberg has been examining the effectiveness of school and family-based curricula to improve the social, emotional, and cognitive competence of children. He is an author of the PATHS Curriculum and of over 200 journal articles and book chapters on the development of wellbeing and the effects of prevention efforts on children and families. Dr. Greenberg consults with numerous foundations and governments around the world on issues related to child development and prevention. He is a Senior Consultant advising the Programs Team.

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Steven Hayes

Steven C. Hayes, PhD, is Nevada Foundation Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada. He is a member of the PNRC Advisory Board. Dr. Hayes has written 32 books and over 400 scientific articles. He is renowned for the development of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, which has shown significant benefit for dealing with diverse psychological and behavior problems, from depression and schizophrenia to chronic pain, job burnout, prejudice, and cigarette smoking. At the same time, he has founded a line of basic research on human language and cognition now pursued in laboratories around the world. Dr. Hayes has been president of several scientific societies, including the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy, and he has served on the National Advisory Council for Drug Abuse in the National Institutes of Health.

Workgroups

Paul Jargowsky

Paul Jargowsky, PhD, is a Senior Research Affiliate at the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan and a member of the Executive Committee of the Texas Schools Project at the University of Texas at Dallas. In spring 2009, he was a Visiting Scholar at the Urban Institute in Washington, DC. Dr. Jargowsky is renowned for his work on high-poverty neighborhoods in U.S. metropolitan areas. The Urban Affairs Association named his book, Poverty and Place: Ghettos, Barrios, and the American City, the Best Book in Urban Affairs for 1997-1998. His work helped to refocus the debate about high-poverty neighborhoods in the inner city away from local neighborhood factors and toward the metropolitan housing and labor markets that contribute to economic segregation. His current research agenda focuses on the consequences of the metropolitan spatial stratification. He is a Senior Consultant on this project and a member of the Measurement and Website Workgroups.

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Richard Spoth

Richard Spoth, PhD, is the F. Wendell Miller Senior Prevention Scientist and Director of the Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute at Iowa State University. Among his research projects funded by NIH, Dr. Spoth received a MERIT Award from NIDA for a large-scale study evaluating combined family- and school-based interventions called the Capable Families and Youth Project. Another prevention trial, Project Family, is one of ten projects selected for NIDA’s Preventing Drug Abuse Among Children and Adolescents: A Research-Based Guide; one of the programs it evaluates has received recognition from several federal agencies. A recent dissemination trial called PROSPER has received awards from the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the National 4H Council. Recently, Dr. Spoth received the Prevention Science Award from the Society for Prevention Research for “outstanding contributions to advancing the field of prevention science.” He has served on numerous federally sponsored expert and technical review panels addressing issues in prevention research and research-practice integration, and by invitation has testified before congress and represented the prevention field in presentations to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.

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Alex Wagenaar

Alex Wagenaar, PhD, is Professor in the Department of Health Outcomes & Policy, College of Medicine and Institute for Child Health Policy at the University of Florida. He has published a book, numerous book chapters, and over 160 scientific articles on social epidemiology, public health policy, legal evaluations, community intervention trials, alcohol and tobacco studies, violence prevention, traffic safety, and injury control. He has a strong interest in evaluation of public policy changes and community-level interventions, using both randomized trial and controlled time-series research designs and statistical methods. He is Associate Director of the Public Health Law Research Program at Temple University, the national program office for a new $15 million initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He is a scientific reviewer for two dozen journals, a member of the Editorial Board of Prevention Science and the Journal of Safety Research, and an Assistant Editor of Addiction. In 1999, Dr. Wagenaar received the prestigious Jellinek award for lifetime achievement in community intervention and policy evaluation research on alcohol. In 2001, he received the Innovator’s Award from the RWJ Foundation, and in 2009, he received the Prevention Scientist Award from the Society for Prevention Research for the contributions of his three decades of research in advancing the methods and outcomes of prevention research.

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David Sloan Wilson

David Sloan Wilson, PhD, is Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Biological Sciences and Anthropology and the Director of the Binghamton Neighborhood Project (BNP), which is study the evolution of prosociality. He is a world-renowned evolutionary biologist who has transformed thinking among biologists about the evolution of prosociality. Dr. Wilson brings an evolutionary perspective to the issue of increasing prosociality in neighborhoods, which will infuse our effort with new theoretical and methodological perspectives.

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Hiro Yoshikawa

Hiro Yoshikawa, PhD, is a Professor of Education at Harvard University who has conducted extensive research on the effects on children of public policies related to welfare, employment, and early childhood intervention. Dr. Yoshikawa is a Senior Consultant advising the Programs Team of the Intervention Workgroup and serving on the Advisory Board.

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Will Aldridge

William A. Aldridge II, Ph.D., is a Center Scientist at the University of South Carolina’s Parenting and Family Research Center (PFRC). Dr. Aldridge’s professional and research interests focus on the transfer of evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies in behavioral, emotional, and mental health to professional, organizational, and community settings, with particular interest in public health approaches and organizational issues. His activities at the PFRC include developing community-wide intervention strategies for strengthening parenting and family functioning, conducting treatment outcome and services research, and fostering community partnerships. Dr. Aldridge’s other interests include organizational development and behavior, strategic management, and public policy. He has extensive clinical training in working with individual adults, couples, parents, and children on a range of emotional and behavioral health problems. Before joining the PFRC, Dr. Aldridge completed his doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Scott Baker

Scott K. Baker, Ph.D., is the Research Director and Associate Director of the Center on Teaching and Learning at the University of Oregon, and Director of Pacific Institutes for Research in Eugene, Oregon. Dr. Baker is Principal Investigator on five Institute of Education Sciences grants focusing on the areas of early reading and mathematics interventions for the full range of learners in school settings, including English language learners. He has been the Principal Investigator on seven research grants funded by the Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education. Dr. Baker’s research and professional interests focus on the learning needs of students with learning difficulties, including students with learning disabilities and English language learners, and translating research to practice.

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Brenda Causey-Mitchell

Brenda A. Causey-Mitchell is the Title 1 Parent/School Liaison for the School District of the City of Pontiac, Michigan. Now retired, Ms. Causey-Mitchell was a government employee for 28 years. She was an appointee of the Mayor for three-and-a-half years, School Board Trustee for eight years, School Board President for two years, Oakland County Commissioner for four years, Oakland County Democratic Caucus Chairperson for one year, and School District Consultant for six years. Ms. Causey-Mitchell is a native of Pontiac. Although she no longer serves in an elected capacity, she continues to serve the City of Pontiac via an annual literacy initiative (Summer Reading Theater); Church Administrator for Victory Church; Public Relations Chairperson for the Oakland County Ministerial Fellowship; Board Member for Pontiac Youth Assistance Program; and as a Senior Citizen Bible Class Instructor, just to name a few.

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LaDonna Coy

LaDonna Coy, MHR, CPS, CDLA has been working in some aspect of prevention and social change from local community initiatives to regional and national efforts for nearly twenty years. The question she grapples with -- how can we bring people together online in meaningful ways to connect, interact, share ideas, and learn? Social media and distance learning technologies are converging in ways that provide unique and increasingly satisfying experiences. From the early days of event planning and technology transfer to more recent work in establishing social networks and virtual communities of practice, her work has taken her into enabling technologies. Her clients include state and national prevention agencies and provider networks supporting local community coalitions. Most recently she established Learning Chi, Inc., specializing in the design, weaving, development, and production of web-based learning sessions, virtual conferences, Interactionars, learning networks, and communities of practice. LaDonna holds a bachelor’s degree in Liberal Studies, a master’s degree in Human Relations from the University of Oklahoma, and certification as a Prevention Specialist and Distance Learning Instructor.

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Dana Eldreth

Dr. Eldreth has a degree in cognitive neuroscience with a focus on cognitive function and brain imaging. She has over 10 years of experience, much of which has focused on Baltimore City, investigating the consequences of substance abuse, foster care, anxiety, aging, and health disparities on cognition, behavior, and brain function. Dr. Eldreth’s research and training is grounded in a lifespan perspective whereby early life decision-making, stress and environmental exposures may adversely impact brain development and function into late-life. She also has training from Johns Hopkins University in intervention methods to promote brain plasticity and state-of-the-art brain imaging techniques to measure it.

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Diane Galloway

Diane Galloway, PhD, is a Senior Project Director at Pacific Research Institute. Since 2007, she has been on the Steering Committee for Data Analysis Coordination & Consolidation with SAMHSA/CSAP. Before becoming a research scientist, Dr. Galloway worked as an educator for more than 20 years. She has led the development of the prevention effort in Wyoming, which was the largest per capita allocation of state funds to prevention to date. Dr. Galloway serves as consultant to the Kernels Team.

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Stephanie Gantt

Stephanie E. Gantt is a native of Atlanta, Georgia. She attended Dillard University in New Orleans, where she graduated with honors in Psychology. Later, she completed an M.A. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Northern Iowa. Her research and professional background is in the areas of suicide and domestic violence as it relates to African American women and adolescents. Some special interests include increasing psychoeducation and mental health awareness within the African American community, the improvement of policies and legislation for increased funding and enhanced mental health service provision in the State of Georgia, and increasing the use of evidence-based interventions to improve high-poverty neighborhoods for youth. One of many ways in which she sought to help improve the lives of youths was serving as the Program Director for the Speak Life Foundation, Inc. from July 2008 through December 2009. She helped develop and implement life survival skills-based interactive workshops for youths ages 12-18 in middle and high schools across the Atlanta Metropolitan area. While doing this, she was nominated to join the Adamsville Business and Community Partnership, Inc. Board of Directors to serve an advocate for increasing youth programs in the Southwest Atlanta, Adamsville community where she grew up. Stephanie has served on this Board since September 2008 and continuously builds relationships with individuals to bring more established and long-term resources to youths in Adamsville. She is a Neighborhood Consultant for the PNRC Programs Team.

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Melanie Hinojosa

Dr. Hinojosa is Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Outcomes & Policy in the College of Medicine and in the Institute for Child Health Policy at the University of Florida. She specializes in racial and ethnic disparities in health outcomes. Her recent work focuses on the development of culturally/linguistically appropriate strategies to improve the health literacy of families. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship in community based participatory research methods and successfully worked with African American, Latino, and Hmong communities in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on a multitude of projects related to reducing health disparities through developing strong community-academic partnerships. Dr. Hinojosa is currently working on developing a health literacy interventions focused on the families of children with special health care needs. She is a member of both the PNRC Policy team and the Networking Workgroup.

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Alisha Wackerle-Hollman

Alisha Wackerle-Hollman is a research associate and project coordinator for the Center for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood (CRtIEC) at the Center for Early Education and Development (CEED), within the University of Minnesota. CRtIEC is federally funded multi-institution center examining the feasibility of adopting a Response to Intervention (RtI) framework in early education settings. Dr. Wackerle-Hollman completed her doctorate in Educational Psychology with a specialization in School Psychology at the University of Minnesota, and is a licensed school psychologist and early educator, with over 8 years experience serving young children with disabilities and the professionals who serve them. For the past 6 years, she has been engaged in a program of research and development which has expanded the pool of early language and literacy general outcome measures and has had extensive experience training teachers to use these assessments in classroom settings. Dr. Wackerle-Hollman research interests include early literacy development and assessment, the transition of research to practice, assessment and intervention for children with autism, children's literature and school readiness.

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Robert Jagers

Robert J. Jagers is an Associate Professor in the Combined Program in Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan School of Education. He received his PhD in developmental psychology from Howard University in Washington, DC. Dr. Jagers was an Associate Professor of African American Studies and Psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago and at Morgan State University School of Public Health and Policy. Prior to joining the faculty at Morgan State University, he served as the Associate Director of Howard University Center for Research on the Education of Students Placed at Risk (CRESPAR). Dr. Jagers is a Co-PI of the newly funded, Center for the Study of Black Youth in Context (CSBYC). He has basic and applied research interests in culture and its relevance for the social and emotional development of African American children and youth. His current work focuses on youth civic activism, with a particular focus on boys and young men.

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Anne Mauricio

Dr. Anne Marie Mauricio is a Faculty Research Associate and clinical researcher at the Prevention Research Center at Arizona State University. Her primary research interests relate to implementation and evaluation of evidence-based preventive interventions, with a specific emphasis on research that can improve quality of implementation.

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Daniel O'Brien

Daniel Tumminelli O’Brien, PhD, is a Visiting Assistant Professor at Binghamton University and has been a key player in the development of the Binghamton Neighborhood Project. His primary interest is in the use of community research collaborations to improve local implementation and to expand general knowledge for application in other settings. His main research area is the study of social behavior in cities from an evolutionary perspective, with two specific foci. The first is the development of prosocial behavior, and how features of urban neighborhoods can influence this process in its young residents. The second is how the physical structures of a neighborhood and their appearance can impact the social dynamics of the local community.

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Keryn Pasch

Keryn E. Pasch is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education at the University of Texas, Austin. She received her Ph.D. in Epidemiology with a minor in Interpersonal Relationships Research from Division of Epidemiology and Community Health at the University of Minnesota and her Master’s in Public Health in Health Behavior and Health Education from the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Pasch was also a National Cancer Institute Postdoctoral Fellow in Cancer Prevention and Control in the Michael and Susan Dell Center for the Advancement of Health Living at the Austin Regional Campus of the University of Texas School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the parental and media influences on child and adolescent health, specifically the areas of substance use and obesity, and the co-occurrence of risk behaviors.

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Robin Payes

Robin Stevens Payes, principal of WordsWork Communications, consults with leaders, policymakers, marketing and public policy experts to define, create, and implement social marketing campaigns. To increase effectiveness of clients’ communications to various audiences, she specializes in applying neuroscience that integrates advances in brain science to increase understanding and promote healthy behaviors. With a 25-year background in television, journalism, public relations, and theatre, Ms. Payes coaches leaders to increase their effectiveness in communicating with a wide variety of audiences through the use of storytelling, metaphor, and improvisation techniques. She helps organizations advance dissemination of complex evidence-advancements in learning and research through the media, through print and video communications, through the Web and through social media.

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Cheri Shapiro

Cheri J. Shapiro is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of South Carolina. After several years as a licensed psychologist, Dr. Shapiro began working as a Research Associate with Ron Prinz (PNRC co-investigator) on the Triple P Population Trial (funded by CDC) at the Department of Psychology at USC. Since 2004, she has been the grant’s Project Director. In addition to her position as Early Career Scientist with the PNRC, she is the Principal Investigator of a three-year grant from the Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood, “Strengthening Families and Reducing Maltreatment Risk in Children with Developmental Disabilities.

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Chaundrissa Smith

Chaundrissa Oyeshiku Smith is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University School of Medicine and is the Clinical Director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic at Grady Health System. A licensed clinical psychologist, Dr. Smith received her undergraduate degree in psychology from Morgan State University and her doctorate in clinical-community psychology from the University of South Carolina. Dr. Smith completed a psychology postdoctoral fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine. For over 10 years, Dr. Smith’s professional training and career has been in child and adolescent psychology. Her clinical and research interests have focused on serving the needs of low-income, African American children and their families through the implementation of evidenced-based and culturally sensitive family interventions. In addition, Dr. Smith has a strong interest in improving the access of behavioral health interventions through the integration of these interventions within pediatric primary care settings. Dr. Smith’s other research interests include depression in children and adolescents, racial/ethnic identity development, and family therapy.

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Amy Tobler

Dr. Tobler is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Outcomes & Policy in the College of Medicine and in the Institute for Child Health Policy at the University of Florida. She specializes in social and community-contextual determinants of health and prevention of substance use among adolescents. She has particular expertise in applied statistical methodology, including longitudinal mixed-effect regression, structural equation modeling, latent class analysis, general growth mixture modeling and meta-analysis. She has published in the areas of underage drinking, alcohol and drug use prevention, and evaluation of alcohol-related policies. Dr. Tobler is Co-Principal Investigator of a project examining the etiology of alcohol use among racially diverse and economically disadvantaged urban youth (Komro, Co-PI) and the Co-Chair of the Policy Team for the PNRC. She was also a co-investigator on recently completed projects evaluating and meta-analyzing the effects of alcohol tax policies on risky behaviors and health outcomes (Wagenaar, PI).

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Mark White

Mark White has lived in Portland since 1992, East Portland since 2000, and the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood since 2002. Mark became President of the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood Association in June of 2008 to fill the position vacated by Jack Vahey, a long-time Powellhurst-Gilbert community volunteer. He was elected for a full two-year term in November 2009. Mark is the creator and primary planner for the East Portland Exposition, which takes place at Ed Benedict Community Park in the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood. He is also an active member of the East Portland Action Plan and the East Portland Enhancement Project. He sits on numerous committees and has been awarded a number of community grants in support of the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood and East Portland as a whole. In 2009, the Powellhurst-Gilbert Neighborhood won the Spirit of Portland Neighborhood of the Year award. That same year, Mark was awarded the Emerging Community Leader award. Additionally, in 2010, Mark was one of eleven citizens nominated for the year’s Coalition for a Livable Future Robert L. Liberty Regional Leadership Award in recognition of his exceptional work in the community.

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Niloofar Bavarian

Niloofar Bavarian, MPH, is currently pursuing her PhD in Public Health at Oregon State University. Her research interests include substance use prevention, violence prevention, sleep hygiene promotion, student development, health behavior theory and methodology. Niloofar has been active in designing, implementing, and evaluating health promotion programs for the college population since 2005. As a PNRC early career scientist, her work will focus on assisting the Research Team and Steering Committee.

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Christine Cody

Christine Cody is an Editorial Assistant/Admin Associate at Oregon Research Institute, where she has worked since 1994, after several years in broadcasting, advertising, entertainment, and as a legal secretary. This diverse background has enhanced her role as editor, helping to translate scientific writing into prose more accessible to the general public. For two years, she was assistant editor of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco newsletter. Ms. Cody has edited two books for Dr. Biglan, and was a contributing author to the 2008 National Cancer Institute Monograph "The Role of the Media in Promoting and Reducing Tobacco Use" and the 2010 NASP-published "Interventions for Achievement and Behavior Problems in a Three-Tier Model Including RTI." She graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Oregon with a Bachelor's Degree in English.

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Alexis Dabroski

Ms. Dabroski is a doctoral student in Social and Community Epidemiology. With a BS in Human Nutrition and an MS in Health Education and Behavior, her research interests are in comprehensive, community-based participatory approaches to addressing childhood obesity, concentrating on the influences of environmental and public health policy change. Her current appointment is in the Institute for Child Health Policy in the College of Medicine at the University of Florida.

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Jessica Guyton

Ms. Guyton received her Bachelor’s in Health Science from the University of Florida in 2010 and is now a Master’s student in Public Health. She has been with the Institute for Child Health Policy since Fall 2009 and assists Drs. Komro, Tobler and Wagenaar in drafting policy briefs and conducting literature searches and reviews about effective and efficient public health policies. She has a special interest in reducing health disparities among disadvantaged populations.

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Andre Ourso

André Ourso is a law student at the University of Florida, Levin College of Law. He joined the Institute for Child Health Policy as a Graduate Research Assistant in the summer of 2010. He has earned an MPH with a concentration in epidemiology from the University of South Florida. André has completed an epidemiology fellowship at the Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology and has assisted county health departments regarding various epidemiological matters. His interests include public health law, healthcare law, and food and drug regulation. He is a member of the PNRC Policies Team.

Workgroups

Marc Schure

Marc Schure is a Public Health Doctoral student at Oregon State University. He completed a Master of Science in Community Health at Montana State University and is also a graduate of University of Wisconsin-Madison, holding a Master of Science degree in Continuing and Vocational Education. Previous research experience includes community-level obesity prevention, mindfulness interventions, and risk-reduction for environmental exposures during childhood. He is currently an Early Career Scientist on the PNRC and a research assistant for Positive Action. Current research interests include nurturing environments and multilevel analyses.

Workgroups

Kristina Socarras

Ms. Socarras is a marriage and family counseling Master’s student at the University of Florida. She graduated from the University of Florida in December 2008 with a Bachelor’s of Science in psychology. Kristina currently works at the Institute of Child Health Policy with the Promised Neighborhood Consortium Policy team. Her interests include working with underrepresented and minority populations and with children and families that have experienced trauma and/or abuse.

Workgroups

Miriam Willmann

Miriam Willmann has a BA in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin -Madison. She currently works as the Director of Technology for the PAXIS Institute. The PAXIS Institute was founded to encourage the extensive collaboration between science and practice of prevention in the U.S. and internationally. Miriam has been with PAXIS since 2005, but worked collaboratively with them for three years as Training and Technical Assistance Coordinator for the WI Wins program, a Reward and Reminder™ campaign designed by PAXIS. She has eight years of experience implementing local and statewide campaigns to stop illegal sales of alcohol and tobacco to underage persons. Additionally, Miriam has experience working on youth advocacy programs. She partnered with organizations including but not limited to the Wisconsin ALA, MADD, FACT, and the American Cancer Society to train youth to be local advocates for a variety of topics.

Workgroups